Bible Dictionary: Sn.   1840

  1. SNAIL, a slimy reptile with a shell on
    its back, Lev. 11:3.   As snails waste
    themselves by their own motion, so do
    the wicked in their irreligious courses,
    Psal. 58:8.
  2. SNARE, a trap or net to catch birds or
    fishes, Prov. 7:23; Job 40:24: that
    which hinders or entangles for hurt,
    Judg. 8:27: evil example, Josh. 23:
    13; Psal. 106:36: an occasion of sin or
    misery, 1 Cor. 7:35; 2 Tim. 2:26.   God
    rains snares on men when He allows their
    sins to bring distress upon them
    , Psal.
    11:6.
  3. SNATCH, to seize greedily, Isa. 9:20.
  4. SNORTING, the noise of well-fed horses,
    especially in order of battle, Jer. 8:16.
  5. SNOUT, the nose of a beast, Prov. 11:
    22.
  6. SNOW, frozen vapours falling in white
    flakes: though not common in Palestine,
    it sometimes falls on the mountain regions
    in very large flakes, from which the ex-
    pression "He giveth snow like wool,"
    Psal. 147:16; 68:14[;] Jer. 18:14.
    Various allusions are made to snow by
    the sacred writers, on account of its
    whiteness and purity, especially as the
    emblem of holiness, Psal. 51:7; Isa. 1:18;
    Lam. 4:7.
  7. SNOWY, having snow, 1 Chron. 11:22.
  8. SNUFF, to draw in the breath as a
    beast, Jer. 2:24; 14:6: to express con-
    tempt, Mal. 1:13.
  9. SNUFF-DISHES, trays for holding the
    sacred snuffers and the snuffs of the
    lamps, Exod. 25:28; Num. 4:9.
  10. SNUFFERS, a kind of tongs for trim-
    ming the sacred lamps, Exod. 37:38;
    2 Kings 12:13.
  11. SO, [h], (a measure for grain), a king of
    Egypt, with whom an alliance was formed
    by Hoshea king of Israel, and which led
    to the overthrow of the kingdom of the
    ten tribes by the king of Assyria, 2
    Kings 17:4.
  12. SO, thus, or in this manner, Gen. 1:7-9;
    19:7; Col. 2:6.
  13. SOAKED, deeply moistened or wetted,
    Isa. 34:7.
  14. SOAP, soap earth is an unctuous kind
    of clay, much esteemed in baths in the
    East, for cleansing and softening the
    skin.   Naaman is supposed to have de-
    sired two mule loads of this earth, 2
    Kings 5:17.   But borith, rendered soap,
    is believed by some to have been the
    herb saltwort, a plant common in Syria,
    Judea, Egypt, and Arabia, where it is
    burnt and water poured upon the ashes,
    from which is prepared a strong alkaline
    or lixivial salt, a kind of soda, adapted
    for taking stains or impurities out of
    wool or cloth, Jer 2:22.
  15. SOBER, abstemious, 1 Thess. 5:6, 8; 1
    Tim. 3:2: considerate, 1 Pet. 1:13; 5:8:
    rational, 2 Cor. 5:13.
  16. SOBERLY, considerately, Rom. 12:3;
    Tit. 2:12.
  17. SOBERNESS, soundness of mind, ratio-
    nality, Acts 26:25.
  18. SOBRIETY, temperance, seriousness, 1
    Tim. 2:9, 15.
  19. SO'COH or SHOCHOH, [h] (tents or taber-
    nacles
    ), a city of Judah, south-west of
    Jerusalem, near to which the Philistines
    encamped when
    David slew Goliath, Josh.
    15:35, 48; 1 Sam. 17:1.
  20. SOCKET, a hollow foot in which the end
    of a pillar may be fixed, Exod. 38:
    27.   Vast numbers of sockets were re-
    quired for the extensive frame-work of
    the tabernacle, some of which were of
    brass and others of silver, 26:19; 27:
    10.
  21. SOD, did seethe, boil, or stew, Gen. 25:
    29; 2 Chron. 35:13.
  22. SODDEN, boiled or stewed, Exod. 12:
    9; Lev. 6:28; Lam. 4:10.
  23. SODERING, fastening parts together
    with metallic cement: gold and silver
    idols were thus put together by a process
    in the fire, Isa. 41:7.
  24. SOD'OM, [h] (their secret or their cement),
    the capital city of a district on the south-
    east of Canaan.   Beauty and fertility
    distinguished this region, through which
    the Jordan flowed, and therefore it was
    chosen as his residence by
    Lot the nephew
    of Abraham, Gen. 13:10, 13.   But irre-
    ligion
    and crime prevailed fearfully in
    Sodom, so that God destroyed it by fire
    from heaven, with three neighbouring
    cities, equally corrupt, Gomorrah, Admah,
    and Zeboim, 18:20; 19:24, 25; Deut.
    29:23.   This direful visitation of the
    Divine wrath caused the waters of the
    Jordan to overflow and stagnate upon
    the ruins, thus forming the sea of the
    plain, or salt sea, usually called the Dead
    sea, Gen. 14:3; Deut. 3:17; Josh. 15:5.
    Vol. describes the district of Sodom
    thus :--"The south of Syria, that is, the
    hollow through which the Jordan flows,
    is a country of volcanoes; the bituminous
    and sulphureous resources of the lake As-
    phaltites, the lava, the pumice-stones
    thrown upon its banks, and the hot baths
    of Tabaria, demonstrate that this valley
    has been the seat of a subterraneous fire,
    which is not yet extinguished.   Clouds
    of smoke are often observed to issue from
    the lake, and new crevices to be formed
    upon its banks.   If conjectures in such
    cases were not too liable to error, we
    might suspect that the whole valley has
    been formed only by a violent sinking of
    a country which formerly poured the
    Jordan into the Mediterranean."
      This
    description, by a modern infidel, confirms
    the language of Moses, Deut. 29:23.
    • Sod_m's Sin.   See Tract.
      e.g. San Francisco, Washington, D.C., etc.
  25. SOFT, moist, as the ground after rain,
    Psal. 65:10.   A soft heart is humble
    and penitent, Job 23:16.   A soft tongue
    is mild in expression, Prov. 15:1; 25:15.
    Soft clothing is costly raiment, Matt. 11:8.
  26. SOFTLY, slowly, Gen. 33:14: mildly,
    Acts 27:13: gently, Judg. 4:21:
    mournfully, 1 Kings 21:27.
  27. SOIL, earth, ground, or land, Ezek. 17:
    8.
  28. SOJOURN, to dwell in a country with-
    out, a fixed habitation, Gen. 12:10; 47:
    4; Ruth 1:1.
  29. SOJOURNED, did sojourn, or dwell for
    a time, Gen. 20:1; 35:27; Heb. 11:9.
  30. SOJOURNER, a stranger or visitor, Gen.
    23:4.   Such is every true Christian in
    this world having his everlasting habi-
    tation and home in Heaven
    , Psal. 39:
    12; Heb. 11:13, 16.
  31. SOJOURNING, the act of dwelling in a
    country without being settled in a habi-
    tation, Judg. 19:1.   The time of the
    sojourning of the Israelites is said to
    have been 430 years, Exod. 12:40: but
    this includes the period from the call of
    Abraham to leave Ur of the Chaldees, to
    become a sojourner, to the emancipation
    of Israel from Egypt, Gen. 15:13; Acts
    7:1; Gal. 3:17.
  32. SOLACE, to cheer, to delight, Prov. 7:
    18.
  33. SOLD, did sell, Gen. 25:33; 47:20,
    22: did engage, as Ahab to work iniquity,
    1 Kings 21:20.
  34. SOLD, disposed of for a price, Lev. 25:
    25: burdened, Rom. 7:14.
  35. SOLDIER, a warrior, John 19:23; Acts
    10:7.   Every
    Christian being engaged in
    a warfare of truth and holiness, is repre-
    sented as a soldier
    , 2 Tim. 2:3.
  36. SOLDIERS, warlike men, 2 Chron. 25:
    13: guards of a country, Ezra 8:22;
    Acts 23:23.   Different weapons and
    costume distinguished the soldiers of the
    various nations, the most terrible of whom
    were the Romans.
  37. SOLE, the bottom of the foot, Gen. 8:
    9; Josh. 1:3.
  38. SOLEMN, religious, Num. 10:10: serious
    or reverential, Psal. 92:3.
  39. SOLEMNITY, a sacred festival, Deut.
    31:10; Isa. 30:29; 33:20.
  40. SOLEMNLY, seriously, earnestly, Gen.
    43:3.
  41. SOLITARY, alone, friendless, 1 Sam.
    8:9; Job 30:3; Psal. 68:6: gloomy,
    dismal, Job 3:7; Isa. 35:1.
  42. SOLITARILY, in solitude, without com-
    pany, Mic. 7:14.
  43. SOL'OMON, [h] (peaceable, perfect, or
    that recompenses).   Solomon was the son of
    David by Bathsheba, born in the year
    B.C. 1033.   At his birth the prophet
    Nathan was inspired to declare that the
    Lord loved him, and to call him Jedidiah,
    or Beloved of the Lord, 2 Sam. 12:24,
    25.   Solomon was educated for the throne
    of Israel: he was favoured with extra-
    ordinary intellectual endowments; and
    his fame was spread through the sur-
    rounding countries for wisdom and pru-
    dence, in which he exceeded all the sages
    of the East and of Egypt.   Solomon
    enjoyed universal peace, reigning over
    the several countries from the Nile to
    the Euphrates; and foreigners flocked
    to hear his discourses on the various
    works of God: his songs were above one
    thousand, and his proverbs were three
    thousand.   He commenced his reign by
    a sacrifice of a thousand burnt-offerings
    which were accepted of God, who favoured
    him with visions.   He erected the mag-
    nificent temple of Jehovah, and flourished
    in unexampled prosperity, riches, and
    glory: but his excessive indulgences led
    him to establish idolatry for the gratifi-
    cation of his thousand heathenish wives
    and concubines, who drew him to comply
    with their blasphemous abominations, by
    which he provoked the LORD.   Solomon
    appears to have returned to the LORD
    by repentance; and his books of Proverbs
    and Ecclesiastes are evident proofs of his
    sincerity; still the deplorable effects of
    his iniquities were seen in the dissolution
    of the nation, under his foolish son Reho-
    boam, and in a long series of calamities
    to Israel.   Every Christian should study
    the various records of the deeply instruc-
    tive history of Solomon, 1 Kings 1:11; 11:
    1 Chron. 22.; 29.; 2 Chron. 1.; 9.
  44. SOLOMON'S SONG: this song is a poem
    believed to have been composed by
    Solomon on occasion of his marriage with
    the daughter of Pharaoh, 1 Kings 3:1.
    Commentators consider Solomon's Song
    as a mystical allegory founded on the
    spiritual relations which existed between
    Jehovah and the Jewish church, and
    especially as they now exist between
    Jesus Christ and His church[es].
    See Commentary.
  45. SOME, a few of a number, Gen. 33:
    15: a part of the whole, Lev. 4:7.
  46. SOMEBODY, one body, Luke 8:46: a
    person of dignity or worth, Acts 5:36.
  47. SOMETHING, a thing of any sort, as a
    piece of money, John 13:29; a portion
    of food, Mark 5:43: a calamity, 1 Sam.
    20:26: information, Acts 23:15, 18: a
    person of consequences, Gal. 6:3.
  48. SOMETIMES, formerly, Eph. 2:13: a
    certain time, 1 Pet. 3:20.
  49. SOMEWHAT, something, 2 Kings 5:20.
  50. SON, a male child correlative to father
    and mother, Gen. 21:2-10: a grandson,
    Gen. 29:5; 2 Sam. 9:9: a pupil or son
    by education, 1 Sam. 3:6: a disciple,
    1 Tim. 1:2.   Israel, as an adopted nation,
    God calls His son, Exod. 4:22.
  51. SON OF GOD, one created of God, as
    Adam, Luke 3:38: an angel, Job 1:1;
    38:7: a
    regenerated person bearing
    the moral image of God and adopted into
    the family of God
    , John 1:12; Rom. 8:
    14; 1 John 3:1.   Professors of the true
    religion are called sons of God, Gen. 6:
    2-4.
  52. SON OF GOD, a title of our Lord and
    Saviour.   Christ is regarded as the Son
    of God, by the miraculous production of
    his human nature of the virgin Mary
    ,
    Luke 1:36: by His commission as sent of
    God
    , John 10:36: by His resurrection, as
    the first-born from the dead
    , Acts 13:
    33: by actual possession of all things as
    the appointed heir
    , Heb. 1:2, 5: by an
    ineffable generation
    , John 3:16; Rom.
    8:3, 32; 1 John 4:9.
  53. SON OF MAN, a title of our Saviour,
    given to Him on account of His true
    humanity
    , Dan. 7:13; Matt. 9:9; Rev.
    1:13; 14:14.
  54. SON OF MAN, a title indicating human
    mortality, Num. 23:19; Job 25:6: a
    title of emphasis, Ezek. 2:1, 8.
  55. SONG, a hymn or psalm, Exod. 15:1;
    2 Sam. 22:1; Rev. 5:9: a poem for
    popular use by repetition, as that pre-
    pared by Moses for the Israelites, Deut.
    31:19, 30: the subject of a song, Exod.
    2:2; Psal. 69:12.
  56. SOON, early, Exod. 2:18: in a short
    time, Deut. 4:26: quickly, Prov. 14:
    17; Tit. 1:7.
  57. SOONER, in a shorter time, Heb. 13:19.
  58. SOOTHSAYER, a prognosticator, magi-
    cian, astrologer
    , or fortune-teller, Dan. 2:
    27; 5:7; Exod. 7:11.   These pretenders
    were generally a class of the heathen
    priests, and they abounded in all pagan
    nations, practising upon the credulity of
    the ignorant people.
  59. SOOTHSAYING, pretending to foretel
    future events, Acts 16:16.
  60. SOP, a piece of bread or other food
    steeped in liquor, John 13:26 [juice].
  61. SOP'ATER, [g] (who defends the
    faith
    ), a
    Christian of Berea, a friend of
    the apostle Paul, Acts 20:4.
  62. SORCERER, a magician, a pretender to
    supernatural knowledge, a soothsayer,
    Acts 13:6, 8.
  63. SORCERESS, a female magician, Isa.
    57:3.
  64. SORCERY, the practice of soothsaying,
    Acts 8:9: wicked pretensions to spi-
    ritual powers, Rev. 9:21; 18:23.
  65. SORE, a wound, Lev. 13:42; Rev. 16:
    2: calamity, Psal. 38:16: misery
    or trouble, 2 Chron. 6:28, 29.
  66. SORE, painful or tender, Job 2:7: dis-
    tressing.
  67. SORE, painfully, 1 Sam. 28:15:
    severely, Isa. 64:9: distressingly, Mark
    14:33.
  68. SO'REK, [h] (vine or hissing), a valley
    whose brook ran through the lot of Dan
    into the Mediterranean, near Gaza, Judg.
    16:4.
  69. SORELY, painfully, Gen. 49:23: griev-
    ously, Isa. 23:5.
  70. SORER, more grievous or severe, Heb.
    10:29.
  71. SORROW, pain, Gen. 3:16, 17: grief,
    Lev. 16:16: calamity, Matt. 24:8:
    sympathising commiseration, Rom. 9:2.
    "Sorrow of the world" causes despair and
    guilt; but "godly sorrow" issues in peace
    with
    God through Christ, 2 Cor. 7:10.
  72. SORROW, to grieve, Jer. 31:12; 1
    Thess. 4:13.
  73. SORROWED, did sorrow or grieve, 2 Cor.
    7:9-11.
  74. SORROWFUL, mournful, 1 Sam. 1:15:
    distressed, Matt. 19:22; 26:23-38.
  75. SORROWING, grieving, Luke 2:48;
    Acts 20:38.
  76. SORRY, grieved, 1 Sam. 22:8; 2 Cor.
    7:8, 9.
  77. SORT, kind, Gen. 6:19: variety, Eccles.
    2:8: class or value, Ezra 1:10: rank,
    Acts 17:5: manner, Rom. 15:15.
  78. SOSIP'ATER, [g] (that saves the
    father
    , or safety of the father), supposed to
    be a native of
    Berea, and the same with
    Sopater, a relative of the apostle Paul,
    Rom. 16:21; Acts 20:4.
  79. SOS'THENES, [g] (saviour, strong,
    powerful
    ), the chief ruler of the Jewish
    synagogue at Corinth, supposed to have
    been
    converted to the faith of Christ by
    the ministry of Paul, Acts 18:17; 1
    Cor. 1:1.
  80. SOTTISH, senseless, inconsiderate, stu-
    pid, Jer. 4:22.
  81. SOUGHT, did seek, Exod. 2:15; 1 Sam.
    10:21; Luke 2:44.
  82. SOUL, the human mind; the vital,
    immaterial, active substance in man, by
    which he understands, remembers, rea-
    son
    s, and wills: it is the immediate pro-
    duction of God, partaking of his spiritual
    nature, created originally in his moral
    image, in knowledge, righteousness, and
    true holiness, Gen. 1:26; 2:7; Eccles. 3:
    21; 12:7; Matt. 10:28; 22:37.   This
    intelligent noble distinction of man con-
    stituted its likeness to God, and its
    accountability to its Creator; but the
    fall of Adam defaced the Divine image:
    and though it still possesses its physical
    powers of understanding will, and affec-
    tions, they are corrupted by sin, and
    every unregenerated soul cherishes en-
    mity
    against the moral character of the
    blessed God.   "[S]pirit and soul and body[,]"
    1 Thess. 5:23, intend, by the spirit, the
    rational mind, which man possesses in
    common with angels; and, by soul and
    body, the animal faculties and parts which
    we possess in common with brutes.
  83. SOUL is used also for a person, Gen. 12:
    5; 14:21; Acts 2:43: life, Psal. 7:5;
    23:3: affection, Gen. 34:8: appe-
    tite, Prov. 6:30; 1 Sam. 18:1: a dead
    body, it having been the residence of the
    soul, Psal. 16:10: so Num. 6:6; 9:6,
    in Hebrew.   Soul or spirit is used to
    denote the life of a perishable animal,
    Eccles. 3:21.
  84. SOUND, a noise, Exod. 28:35; 2
    Sam. 15:10.
  85. SOUND, to make a noise, Lev. 25:9;
    1 Cor. 15:52.
  86. SOUND, whole or healthy, Prov. 14:
    30: true, Prov. 2:7; Tit. 1:9: pure, 2:8:
    rational, 2 Tim. 1:7: decided, Tit. 1:13.
  87. SOUNDED, did sound, Exod. 19:19:
    became published, 1 Thess. 1:8: did
    measure, as at sea, Acts 27:28.
  88. SOUNDING, making a noise, 2 Chron.
    5:12: capable of giving a sound, 1 Cor.
    13:1.
  89. SOUNDNESS, healthiness, Psal. 38:
    3: political righteousness, Isa. 1:6.
  90. SOUR, acid, unripe, Isa. 18:5.   "Eat-
    ing the sour grape"
    denotes wicked
    practices, which bring misery, Jer. 31:
    29.
  91. SOUTH, the local situation of a place,
    as Egypt and Sheba lay to the south of
    Canaan, Gen. 12:9; 20:1; Matt. 12:42.
  92. SOUTHWARD, towards the south, Gen.
    13:14.
  93. SOW, a female pig, 2 Pet. 2:22.
  94. SOW, to scatter seed on the cultivated
    ground with a view to fruit in harvest,
    Gen. [47]:23; Matt. 13:3: to disperse,
    as a people, Zech. 10:9: to
    preach the
    gospel
    , 1 Cor. 9:11: to employ talents
    for the honour of God, 2 Cor. 9:10.
    "Sowing to the flesh" is leading a life
    of sensual indulgence; "sowing to the
    Spirit"
    is leading a life of holiness in
    glorifying God, Gal. 6:8.
  95. SOWED, did sow, Gen. 26:12.
  96. SOWER, he that scatters the seed, Isa.
    55:10; 2 Cor. 9:10.
  97. SOWN, scattered as seed, Judg. 6:3:
    laid in the grave, or buried, as the body
    1 Cor. 15:42-44: performed, as works of
    righteousness, 2 Cor. 9:10.
  98. SPACE, distance of place, John 3:4;
    Rev. 14:20: a period of time, Lev. 25:
    8-30; Acts 20:31.
  99. SPAIN, Σπανια (rare or precious), a large
    country, about 650 miles long and 550
    broad, forming a peninsula at the western
    extremity of Europe: this great country
    was peopled by the descendants of Japhet,
    Gen. 10:2-5: its present population ex-
    ceeds 14,000,000, and they are mostly
    Roman Catholics.
     
    Paul purposed to
    preach the gospel in Spain; but we have
    little evidence of his ever proceeding
    westward beyond Rome, Rom. 15:24-
    28.
  100. SPAKE, did speak, Gen. 19:14; John
    1:15; 11:13, 51.
  101. SPAN, a measure of three hand-breadths,
    or about eleven inches, Exod. 28:16;
    1 Sam. 17:4.
  102. SPANNED, measured accurately, Isa.
    48:13.
  103. SPARE, to forgive and preserve, Gen.
    18:24-26: to withhold, Prov. 19:18:
    to reserve, Luke 15:17.
  104. SPARED, did spare or reserve, 1 Sam.
    15:1: did withhold, Rom. 8:32: did
    exempt from
    punishment, 2 Pet. 2:4, 5.
  105. SPARINGLY, niggardly, 2 Cor. 9:6.
  106. SPARK, a particle darted from a fire,
    Job 18:5; Isa. 50:11.
  107. SPARKLED, glittered, Ezek. 1:7.
  108. SPARROW, a small bird, well known as
    frequenting the habitations of men, Psal.
    84:3; Luke 12:6.
  109. SPEAK, to say, Gen. 18:27: to de-
    clare, Judg. 12:30: to address, 1 Sam.
    25:17: to converse, 2 Sam. 3:19: to
    discourse, Exod. 4:14: to
    preach, Acts
    5:20; 1 Pet. 4:11: to entreat, 1 Kings
    2:19: to report, Jam. 4:11.
  110. SPEAKER, one who speaks, Psal. 140:
    11: an orator, Acts 14:12.
  111. SPEAKING, uttering words, Matt. 6:7:
    censuring, Eph. 4:31: talking, Job 1:16:
    arguing, Ruth 1:18:
    preaching, Acts 14:
    3: praying, Gen. 24:15.
  112. SPEAR, a long weapon with a sharp
    point, 1 Sam. 26:7-16; John 19:34.
  113. SPEARMEN, soldiers armed with spears,
    Acts 23:23.
  114. SPECIAL, peculiar, selected, Deut. 7:
    6: extraordinary, Acts 19:11.
  115. SPECKLED, variously spotted, as some
    cattle, Gen. 30:32; Zech. 1:8.
  116. SPECTACLE, a public show, as some
    criminals were exposed to wild beasts in
    theatres, for the entertainment of the
    populace, especially at Rome, 1 Cor. 4:
    9; 15:32; Heb. 10:32, 33.
  117. SPED, succeeded, Judg. 5:30.
  118. SPEECH, a discourse, Gen. 4:23: lan-
    guage, 11:1: utterance, Exod. 4:10;
    2 Cor. 10:10: articulation, Mark 7:32:
    conversation, Col. 4:6.
  119. SPEECHLESS, destitute of the power of
    speech, Luke 1:22: mute with dread,
    Matt. 22:12; or astonishment, Acts
    9:7.
  120. SPEED, haste, Ezra 6:12: success,
    Gen. 24:12.
  121. SPEEDILY, quickly, 2 Sam. 17:16:
    immediately, Eccles. 8:11: certainly,
    Luke 18:8.
  122. SPEEDY, early, immediate, Zeph. 1:18.
  123. SPEND, to make use of, as money, Isa.
    55:2; or time, Acts 20:16; or life, Job
    21:13; 2 Cor. 12:15: to waste, Prov.
    21:2.
  124. SPENT, used, Gen. 21:15: consumed,
    Jer. 37:21: passed away, Rom. 13:
    12.
  125. SPICE, an aromatic substance, especi-
    ally calamus, cassia, cinnamon, frankin-
    cense, myrrh, &c., Gen. 43:11.   Spices,
    were used for perfume, Exod. 25:6;
    2 Kings 20:13; to season food or wine,
    Ezek. 24:10; Sol. Song 8:2; to em-
    balm the
    dead, Luke 23:56.   See
    INCENSE and PERFUME.
  126. SPICE, to season, as for food, Ezek.
    24:10.
  127. SPICED, seasoned, flavoured, Sol. Song
    8:2.
  128. SPICERY, the commodity of spices, as
    articles of commerce, Gen. 37:25.
  129. SPIDER, a well-known insect, of which
    there are many species, remarkable for
    their webs and nests of curious texture,
    Job 8:14; Isa. 59:5.   Solomon is be-
    lieved to have intended a small lizard
    by the word rendered spider, Prov. 30:
    28.
  130. SPIED, did spy or observe, Exod. 2:
    11.
  131. SPIES, those who are set to watch or
    explore a country or place, Gen. 42:9;
    Josh. 6:23.
  132. SPIKENARD, a highly aromatic plant
    of India or Persia; the oil or extract of
    which was formed into a precious oint-
    ment of perfume, Sol. Song 1:12; 4:12;
    Mark 14:3; John 12:3.
  133. SPILLED, did spill, shed, or pour out,
    Mark 2:22.
  134. SPILT, shed or poured out, 2 Sam. 14:
    14.
  135. SPIN, to draw out into a thread, as
    wool, flax, or silk, Exod. 35:25.
    Spinning was the almost universal em-
    ployment of women in the East; and the
    spinning-wheel was therefore a piece of
    necessary domestic furniture in Judea
    and Egypt.
  136. SPINDLE, the long axis of a wheel
    used for spinning, Prov. 31:19.
  137. SPIRIT (Heb. רוח, ruach, Gr. πνευμα,
    pneuma, Lat. spiritus), a word denoting
    something incorporeal, and variously ap-
    plied in the Scriptures, Job 4:15; Luke
    24:37-39, both to God and to men: it
    is especially used to express the human
    mind or rational soul, Exod. 6:9; or
    some passion, temper, or disposition, both
    in the godly and the ungodly, Matt.
    26:41; Col. 2:5.
  138. SPIRIT: God is a spirit, the self-exist-
    ent, eternal, and infinitely excellent Spirit,
    the Author, Source, and Preserver
    of all
    created spirits, John 4:23, 24; Num.
    16:22; Heb. 12:9.
  139. SPIRIT, THE: this title is emphatically
    applied to the Spirit of God, the Holy
    Spirit
    , Mal. 2:15; Matt. 4:1; Acts 2:4;
    Gal. 3:2.
  140. SPIRIT OF GOD, God Himself, the
    Deity
    , Job 27:3; 33:4.   This title
    is especially applied to the Holy Spirit,
    Gen. 1:2; Exod. 31:3; Matt. 3:16;
    Rom. 8:9-15.   Spirit of God denotes
    the extraordinary gifts of wisdom, know-
    ledge, and practical skill, Exod. 31:3.
  141. SPIRIT, HOLY, the peculiar title of
    the third Person in the adorable
    God-
    head
    , as distinguished in the economy
    of redemption and grace, from the Father
    and the Son
    , Isa. 63:10, 11; Luke 11:
    13; Matt. 28:19.
  142. SPIRIT OF CHRIST, a title of the Holy
    Spirit, His gifts and graces being poured
    forth by
    Christ after His ascension to
    heaven, as the fruit of His work of re-
    demption
    , 1 Pet. 1:11; Acts 2:32, 33;
    Eph. 4:8-11.
  143. SPIRIT OF TRUTH, a title of the Holy
    Spirit, on account of His filling the devout
    mind with saving doctrine
    , John 14:17;
    15:26: the doctrine of salvation, 1 John
    4:6.
  144. SPIRIT OF MAN, the intelligent rational
    soul, Prov. 20:27; 1 Cor. 2:11.
  145. SPIRIT OF A BEAST, the animal life
    and instinct of a brute, Eccles. 3:21.
  146. SPIRIT OF ADOPTION, the temper and
    disposition of the true children of
    God,
    Rom. 8:15.
  147. SPIRIT OF PROPHECY, the doctrine of
    inspired prophecy, Rev. 19:[10].
  148. SPIRIT OF DIVINATION (Gr. a spirit of
    Python
    ), the same as "a familiar spirit,"
    denounced by Moses, Lev. 20:6-27; 1
    Sam. 28:7.   Apollo, the fabulous
    divinity of the heathen, was called Py-
    thius; his famous oracle at Delphos,
    Pytho; his priestesses, Pythia: and ven-
    triloquists, who were soothsayers or for-
    tune-tellers, were supposed to be inspired
    by Apollo, having the spirit of divination,
    Acts 16:16.
  149. SPIRITS, intelligent incorporeal beings,
    Heb. 12:9: angels, Psal. 104:4: devils,
    Luke 10:20: the souls of the blessed,
    Heb. 12:23: the souls of the
    lost, to
    whom Noah, inspired by the Spirit of
    Christ, preached but in vain, while he
    was preparing the ark, 1 Pet. 3:19.
  150. SPIRITUAL, relating to spirits, Eph. 1:
    3; 6:12:
    holy and reaching to the heart,
    Rom. 7:14: devoutly religious, Hos. 2:
    7; 1 Cor. 2:15.
  151. SPIRITUAL BODY, a body adapted to
    the heavenly state, as the glorified body
    of the Christian at the resurrection,
    formed after the body of Christ, 1 Cor.
    15:44; Phil. 3:21.
  152. SPIRITUAL HOUSE, the regenerated
    family of Christians, 1 Pet. 2:5.
  153. SPIRITUALLY, devoutly, religiously,
    Rom. 8:6: morally, or according to
    the moral quality, Rev. 11:8.
  154. SPIT, to eject from the mouth, Lev.
    15:8; 1 Sam. 21:13.   To spit on a per-
    son, especially on the face, was the
    greatest insult in the East, Deut. 25:9;
    Mark 10:23.
  155. SPITE, malice or hatred, Psal. 10:14.
  156. SPITEFULLY, maliciously, Matt. 22:6.
  157. SPITTLE, the moisture of the mouth,
    Job 7:9; John 9:6.
  158. SPOIL, goods taken from those con-
    quered, Deut. 2:35; 2 Chron. 20:25.
  159. SPOIL, to seize the goods of the con-
    quered, 1 Sam. 14:36: to plunder, Jer.
    20:5: to injure in property, Exod. 3:
    22; or in
    mind, Col. 2:8.
  160. SPOILED, plundered, Gen. 34:27;
    2 Kings 7:16.
  161. SPOILER, an enemy, Isa. 21:2; Judg.
    2:14.
  162. SPOILING, violent injuring, Heb. 10:34:
    grief, Psal. 35:12.
  163. SPOILS, goods taken from a conquered
    enemy, Josh. 7:21; Heb. 7:4.
  164. SPOKEN, declared, Gen. 18:19: ut-
    tered, Matt. 26:65: counselled, 2 Sam.
    17:6:
    preached, Acts 16:14: cele-
    brated or extolled, Rom. 1:8.
  165. SPOKES, the bars of a wheel, 1 Kings
    7:33.
  166. SPOKESMAN, a speaker for another,
    Exod. 4:16.
  167. SPOON, a small ladle used in trimming
    and supplying the lamps of the taber-
    nacle, Num. 4:7; 7:14.
  168. SPORT, diversion, Judg. 16:25; Prov.
    10:23.
  169. SPORT, to make diversion, Isa. 57:4.
  170. SPORTING, playing, diverting, Gen.
    26:8.  
    Wicked men "sport with their
    own deceivings"
    in trifling with reli-
    gious matters, 2 Pet. 2:13.
  171. SPOT, a mark on the skin, Num. 19:
    2; Jer. 13:23: a defect, 1 Pet. 1:19:
    characteristic behaviour, Deut. 32:
    5: a moral stain, a
    sin, 2 Pet. 2:13; 3:
    14.
  172. SPOTTED, marked on the skin, Gen.
    30:32, 39: defiled, Jude 23.
  173. SPOUSE, a wife, Sol. Song 4:8; Hos.
    4:13.
  174. SPRANG, did spring, leap, or haste,
    Acts 16:29: did arise, as fruit from
    seed, Mark 4:8; as children from a
    founder of a family, Heb. 7:14; 11:12.
  175. SPREAD, to extend, Gen. 10:18; Lev.
    13:5-32: to expand, Gen. 33:19:
    to lay open, Judg. 8:25: become pub-
    lic, Acts 4:17.
  176. SPREADING, extending, Lev. 13:57;
    Ezek. 17:6.
  177. SPRIGS, small branches, Isa. 18:5;
    Ezek. 17:6.
  178. SPRING, a fountain, 2 Kings 2:21;
    Deut. 4:49: sunrise, 1 Sam. 9:26:
    shooting forth, as a tree, Ezek. 17:9.
  179. SPRING, to rise, as water in a fountain,
    Num. 21:17; Deut. 8:7: to grow, Isa.
    61:11: to originate, Job 5:6.
  180. SPRING, did spring or grow, Gen. 41:
    6; Matt. 13:5: did appear, Lev. 13:42:
    did arise, Matt. 4:16.
  181. SPRINGING, flowing, Gen. 26:19:
    growing, 2 Sam. 23:4: appearing,
    Heb. 12:15.
  182. SPRINKLE, to scatter, as dust or ashes,
    Exod. 9:8; or water, Num. 8:7; 19:
    18: to distinguish with imparted benefits,
    Isa. 52:15.
  183. SPRINKLED, scattered in small par-
    ticles, as ashes, Exod. 9:10; or in small
    drops, as water, Num. 19:13; or blood,
    Heb. 9:19.   "Our hearts sprinkled
    from an evil conscience,"
    intends the
    mind being relieved or purified from
    guilt, by faith in the atonement of Christ,
    10:22.
  184. SPRINKLING, scattering, as ashes, Heb.
    9:13; or blood, 11:28.
  185. SPROUT, to germinate, Job 14:7.
  186. SPUE, to vomit, Lev. 18:28; Jer.
    25:27; Rev. 3:16.
  187. SPUN, did spin, Exod. 35:25, 26.
  188. SPUNGE, a submarine substance, formed
    by a species of worms, and most fitted of
    all bodies to imbibe a large quantity of
    fluid, Matt. 27:48; John 19:29.
  189. SPY, to search or survey, Num. 13:
    16; Josh. 2:1: to discover, Gal. 2:4.
  190. SQUARE, a figure having four equal
    sides, Ezek. 43:15; 45:2; Rev. 21:16.
  191. SQUARED, made square, Ezek. 41:21.
  192. STABILITY, firmness, fixedness, Isa.
    33:6.
  193. STABLE, a shed or house for beasts, as
    camels or horses, Ezek. 25:5.
  194. STABLE, firm or fixed, 1 Chron. 16:30.
  195. STABLISH, to fix, settle, or make firm,
    as temporal interests, 1 Chron. 17:12;
    the servant of God in a course of holi-
    ness, Rom. 16:25; or the heart in assur-
    ance of the Divine favour, 1 Pet. 5:10.
  196. STACHYS, Σταχυς (spike), a beloved
    Christian friend of the apostle Paul at
    Rome, Rom. 16:9.
  197. STACKS, piles or heaps, as of corn,
    Exod. 22:6.
  198. STACTE, liquid myrrh in its purest
    state, the fragrant gum that distils from
    the myrrh tree, Exod. 30:34.
  199. STAFF, a traveller's walking-stick,
    Gen. 32:10: a supporter, Isa. 3:1;
    Ezek. 29:6.
  200. STAGGER, to reel in walking, as a
    drunken man, Job 12:25.
  201. STAGGERED, hesitated or doubted, Rom.
    4:20.
  202. STAIN, to mark with disgrace, Job 3:
    5; Isa. 23:9.
  203. STAIRS, steps leading to upper apart-
    ments, 1 Kings 6:8; Ezek. 43:17.
  204. STAKES, poles fixed in the ground to
    support a tent; in allusion to which the
    supporters of the church are so called,
    Isa. 33:20; 54:2.
  205. STALK, the stem of an ear of corn,
    Gen. 41:5; or of flax, Josh. 2:6.
  206. STALL, a place for an ox or a horse to
    stand and feed under shelter, Luke 16:
    15; 2 Chron. 24:28.   Solomon had
    40,000 stalls for horses, 1 Kings 4:26.
  207. STALLED, fed in a stall, as a fatted ox,
    Prov. 15:17.
  208. STAMMERERS, those who speak with
    difficulty, usually through some defect
    in the organs of speech, Isa. 32:4.
  209. STAMMERING, hesitating in speech,
    Isa. 28:11.
  210. STAMP, to tread with violence, 2 Sam.
    22:43; Ezek. 6:11.
  211. STAMPED, did stamp or destroy, Deut.
    9:21; 2 Kings 23:6.
  212. STANCHED, stopped from running, as
    blood, Luke 8:44.
  213. STAND, a halt, as through lameness,
    Ezek. 29:7.
  214. STAND, to be upon the feet, Gen. 24:
    43; 2 Kings 5:11: to wait upon, as in
    service, Deut. 18:5; 1 Kings 18:1:
    to appear, as in judgment, Acts 25:10:
    to abide trial in judgment, Est. 3:4;
    Psal. 1:5: to be fixed or established, Isa.
    40:8; 1 Cor. 15:1: to be determined in
    duty, Eph. 6:13, 14: to continue, Dan.
    2:44; Matt. 12:25.
  215. STANDARD, an ensign or flag, to indi-
    cate a division or part of a camp, as each
    of the tribes had a distinct standard in
    the camp of
    Israel, Num. 2:3, 25.
  216. STANDARD-BEARER, the man who car-
    ries the standard before or in the midst
    of a division in a camp; a leader, Isa. 10:18.
  217. STANDING, power to stand, Mic. 1:2.
  218. STANDING, being on the feet, 1 Sam.
    22:6: being erect, Lev. 26:1: being
    in the appointed station, 1 Sam. 19:20;
    1 Kings 22:19: continuing, Heb. 9:8.
  219. STANK, did stink, Exod. 7:21: became
    abhorred, 2 Sam. 10:6.
  220. STAR, a celestial luminary, 1 Cor. 15:
    41.   Stars, in common language, include
    all the heavenly bodies except the sun
    and moon: some revolve round the sun,
    and are called planets and comets; others
    retain the same relative distance from
    the stars which surround them, and are
    therefore called fixed stars.  
    God created
    all these, probably [during the same week as]
    that of the creation of our world,
    or of the solar system, and for purposes
    worthy of His infinite wisdom.   God calls
    them all by their names, Psal. 147:4:
    but how many are the stars, no human
    being knows.   About a thousand are
    visible to the naked eye.   Tycho Brahe,
    about the year 1590, gave a catalogue of
    770 stars: Mr. Flamsted's telescopes
    enabled him to discover about three
    thousand: but Riccioli supposed there
    are 400,000,000!   Astronomers have cal-
    culated that Sirius, or the Dog Star, is
    the nearest of the fixed stars to us, and
    that its distance is not less than 400,000
    times greater than that of the sun; while
    some of them are six hundred times more
    remote than Sirius!
      Several thousand
    years are therefore required for the light
    of some of the stars to reach the earth,
    although light travels at the rate of
    thirteen millions of miles in a minute!
    And as new stars have been discovered
    within the last few years, it is thought
    probable that some exist whose light
    has not yet reached our world.   How in-
    finitely glorious therefore must be the
    majesty and greatness of God the Creator!
    See SUN.   CONSTELLATION.
  221. STAR, DAY, that perfect illumination
    and knowledge which will be possessed
    by the
    Christian in Heaven, 2 Pet. 1:19.
  222. STAR, MORNING, a title of Christ, indi-
    cating His fulness of intelligence, blessed-
    ness, and glory
    , for the welfare of be-
    lievers, Rev. 22:16; 2:28.
  223. STAR OF BALAAM; the involuntary
    prediction of that wicked man denoted a
    mighty conqueror, as king David, who
    vanquished Moab, 2 Sam. 8:2; or Christ
    whose spiritual conquests regard all na-
    tions, as do his awful retribution in judg-
    ment.
  224. STARS denote princes and rulers, Dan.
    8:10; Isa. 14:13: and
    ministers of the
    gospel, pastors of Christian churches,
    Rev. 1:16, 20.
  225. STARE, to gaze upon, Psal. 22:17.
  226. STARGAZERS, astrologers, pretenders
    of the knowledge of future events, Isa.
    47:13.
  227. STATE, condition, Psal. 39:5; Matt.
    12:45.
  228. STATELY, grandly, majestically, Ezek.
    23:41.
  229. STATION, situation, settled place, Isa.
    22:19.
  230. STATURE, height, as of a man, Num.
    13:32; 2 Sam. 21:20; or tree, Ezek.
    31:3: advancement in spiritual attain-
    ments, Eph. 4:13.
  231. STATUTE, a law, Exod. 29:9; Dan.
    6:7, 15.
  232. STATUTES, laws and ordinances, Lev.
    10:11; Num. 30:16: precepts or doc-
    trines, Psalm 19:8; 119:12, 54.
  233. STAVES, staffs, Num. 21:18: bars,
    Exod. 25:13, 14.
  234. STAY, a stop or ceasing, Lev. 13:5: a
    supporter, 2 Sam. 22:19; 1 Kings 10:19:
    the means of support, Isa. 3:1.
  235. STAY, to remain, Exod. 9:28: to delay,
    Gen. 19:17: to hinder or oppose, Dan.
    4:35: to prevent, Job 38:37.
  236. STAYED, waited, Gen. 8:10: con-
    tinued, 33:4: detained, Exod. 10:24;
    Luke 4:42: supported, Exod. 17:12:
    satisfied, 1 Sam. 24:7: reposed, Isa.
    26:3.
  237. STEAD, place or room, Gen. 2:21; 4:
    25; Esth. 2:4.
  238. STEADY, supported, Exod. 17:12.
  239. STEAL, to commit theft, to take the
    property of another without his consent
    ,
    Gen. 44:8: to go off privily as a thief
    with stolen goods
    , 31:27.
  240. STEALING, the act of theft, Deut. 24:7.
  241. STEDFAST, fixed, constant, Psal. 78:
    8; Heb. 6:19: immutable, as God, Dan.
    6:26; or his revealed will, 2:2.
  242. STEDFASTLY, firmly, determinately,
    Ruth 1:18; Luke 9:51: intently, Acts 1:
    10; 2 Cor. 3:7.
  243. STEDFASTNESS, resoluteness, 2 Pet. 3:
    17; Col. 2:5.
  244. STEEL, iron peculiarly purified and
    hardened, Job 20:24; Jer. 15:12.
  245. STEEP, a place deeply inclining, a pre-
    cipice, Ezek. 38:20; Matt. 8:32.
  246. STEM, the stalk or trunk of a tree,
    metaphorically a principal founder of a
    family, Isa. 11:1.
  247. STEP, a distance that a person steps in
    walking, 1 Sam. 20:3: a stair, Exod. 20:
    26; 1 Kings 10:20: a course of life, Job
    31:7; Rom. 4:12: God's steps are the
    precepts of his law
    , Job 23:11.
  248. STEPHANAS, Στεφανας (a crown, or
    crowned), a Corinthian
    Christian of great
    honour and benevolence: he was with
    the apostle Paul at Ephesus, 1 Cor. 1:16;
    16:15, 17.
  249. STEPHEN, Στεφανος (a crown or crowned),
    one of the seven Greek deacons of the
    Christian
    church at Jerusalem; he was a
    man of extraordinary piety and gifts, and
    his murder, by the Jewish populace, after
    his noble defence of Christianity before
    the council, has rendered his name famous,
    as [one of] the first [N.T.] martyr[s] for Christ, Acts 7:59;
    8:2; 22:20.
    • Stephen.   A real, Baptist preacher.
  250. STERN, the hinder part of a ship,
    Acts 27:29.
  251. STEWARD, a chief servant or officer in
    a great family, appointed to manage the
    affairs of the household, Gen. 15:2; 43:
    19: a deputy of a king for the manage-
    ment of a particular branch of the public
    service, 1 Kings 16:9: a provincial rule,
    1 Chron. 28:1: and Christian
    pastors
    are therefore called stewards, Tit. 1:7;
    1 Cor. 4:1.
  252. STEWARDSHIP, the office of a steward,
    Luke 16:2, 4.
  253. STICK, a piece of wood, as a wand or
    walking-stick, Ezek. 37:16, 20: a
    fragment of a tree, 2 Kings 6:6; Num.
    15:32.
  254. STICK, to adhere or join, Job 41:17;
    Ezek. 29:4: to pierce in, Psal. 38:
    2: to protrude, Job 33:21.
  255. STIFF, unbending, obstinate, Jer. 17:
    23.
  256. STIFF-NECKED, hardened in heart,
    impenitent, Exod. 32:9; Acts 7:
    51.
  257. STILL, motionless, Exod. 15:16: quiet,
    Psal. 107:29: weak in sound, 1 Kings
    19:12: considerate, Psal. 46:10.
  258. STILL, yet, till now, Gen. 41:21: con-
    tinually, 2 Kings 7:4: nevertheless,
    Job 2:3.
  259. STILLED, did still or quiet, Num. 13:
    30; Neh. 8:11.
  260. STING, that which pierces and pains,
    1 Cor. 15:55, 56: the offensive weapon
    of a serpent, Prov. 23:32; or scorpion,
    Rev. 9:10: the agony of a guilty con-
    science in a future life is called a sting,
    1 Cor. 15:55.
  261. STINK, to emit an offensive smell,
    Exod. 7:18; John 11:39: to be regarded
    with horror, Gen. 34:30.
  262. STIR, a commotion or tumult, Acts 12:
    18; 19:23.
  263. STIR, to move or excite, Num. 34:
    9: to admonish, 2 Pet. 1:13: to use, 2 Tim.
    1:6.
  264. STIRRED, excited, 1 Kings 11:14; Acts
    18:18.
  265. STOCK, the stem or trunk of a tree,
    Job 14:8: an idol-deity made of wood,
    Isa. 44:19: the lineage of a family,
    Lev. 25:47; Acts 13:26.
  266. STOCKS, idols made from logs of wood,
    Jer. 3:9; Hos. 4:12: a wooden instru-
    ment to torture prisoners by the feet,
    Job 13:27; Jer. 20:2; Acts 16:24.
  267. STO'ICS, Στωικοι, philosophers of a
    Grecian sect, founded by Zeno, a native
    of Cyprus, who died in the year B. C.
    264: they were called Stoics from Zeno
    having taught in the stoa or portico, at
    Athens, Acts 17:18.   The Stoics held
    that God is eternal, underived, and in-
    corruptible, possesses infinite wisdom and
    goodness, the Creator of all things from
    an original and eternal matter, and the
    constant preserver and governor of the
    world, yet bound by an irresistible fate.
    Philosophers of this sect taught that
    external evils were only imaginary; that
    virtue was its own reward: some of them
    held that all spirits, both of men and of
    their gods, would at length be absorbed
    in the Deity.   Some of their notions are
    absurd, while others were evidently bor-
    rowed from the Old Testament.
  268. STOLE, did steal, Gen. 31:20; Eph.
    4:28: gained by corrupt means, 2 Sam.
    15:16: secreted, 2 Kings 11:2.
  269. STOLEN, taken by theft, Gen. 31:19,
    30: retained fraudulently, 30:33.
  270. STOMACH, the ventricle of digestion,
    the appetite, 1 Tim. 5:23.
  271. STOMACHER, a garment for the breast
    or waist, a kind of girdle, Isa. 3:24.
  272. STONE, a mineral of which great varie-
    ties are found in the East, especially suit-
    able for building, Deut. 8:9; 1 Kings 5:
    17; and jewels, 2 Sam. 12:30; 1 Kings 10:2.
  273. STONE, is put for a distinguished per-
    sonage, as Joseph, being the support of
    his father's house, became the stone of
    Israel, Gen. 49:24: Christ, as the sup-
    port
    and defence of His church, is the
    chief corner stone
    , Matt. 21:42.   See
    CORNER STONE.   LIVING STONE.
  274. STONE, to put to death by throwing
    stones at a condemned person, Lev. 20:
    2; 1 Kings 21:10.
  275. STONED, did stone to death, Josh. 7:
    25; 1 Kings 21:15; Acts 7:58.
  276. STONED, killed, beaten with stones,
    Exod. 19:13: persecuted with the throw-
    ing of stones, Acts 14:19.
  277. STONING, execution with the throwing
    of stones, 1 Sam. 30:6.
  278. STONY, rocky, abounding with stones,
    Matt. 13:5.
  279. STONY-HEART, a senseless impious
    mind, Ezek. 11:19.
  280. STOOD, did stand, Gen. 18:22: did
    flow, Josh. 3:16.
  281. STOOD, were stationed, Isa. 6:2: con-
    sisted, Heb. 9:10.
  282. STOODEST, didst stand, Deut. 4:10.
  283. STOOL, a seat without a back, 2 Kings
    4:10.
  284. STOOP, to bend forward, Mark 1:7:
    to yield or submit, Job 9:13: to be de-
    graded, Isa. 46:1.
  285. STOOPED, did stoop, John 8:6.
  286. STOP, to hinder, 1 Kings 18:44: to
    obstruct, Psal. 35:3: to prevent, 2 Cor.
    11:10.
  287. STOPPED, closed, Gen. 8:2; Neh. 4:
    7: covered or concealed, Gen. 26:15:
    confounded, Tit. 1:2.
  288. STORE, an abundance, Gen. 26:14:
    a large quantity, 1 Kings 10:10; Neh. 5:
    18: reserve, 1 Cor. 16:2; 2 Pet. 3:7.
  289. STORE, to heap up, Amos 3:10.
  290. STORE-CITIES, towns consisting of store-
    houses, 1 Kings 11:19.
  291. STORE-HOUSES, houses for the preser-
    vation of corn, arms, and needful things,
    Gen. 41:56; 2 Chron. 32:28.
  292. STORIES, flights of rooms in a house,
    Gen. 6:16; Ezek. 41:16.
  293. STORK, a large bird resembling the
    crane, remarkable for its annual migra-
    tions, and for tenderness in supporting
    its dam in decrepitude.   On this account
    the stork is still an object of veneration
    among the common people in some parts
    of Europe, Lev. 11:19; Psal. 104:17; Jer.
    8:7.
  294. STORM, a tempest, violent wind with
    rain, Isa. 4:6; Mark 4:37.   See
    TEMPEST.
  295. STORMY, tempestuous, violent with
    wind and rain, Psal. 148:8; Ezek. 13:
    11-13.
  296. STORY, a narrative or history, 2 Chron.
    13:22; 24:27.
  297. STOUT, strong, courageous, Job 4:11;
    Dan. 7:20: daring, haughty, Isa. 10:12;
    Mal. 3:13.
  298. STOUT-HEARTED, bold, resolute, Psal.
    76:5: ungodly, Isa. 46:12.
  299. STOUTNESS, boldness, obstinacy, Isa.
    9:9.
  300. STRAIGHT, directly forward, Josh. 6:
    5: erect, upright, Luke 13:13: Isa. 40:
    3, 4: safe, Jer. 31:9.
  301. STRAIGHTWAY, immediately, 1 Sam.
    28:20; Acts 5:10: in a little time, 1
    Sam. 9:13; Jam. 1:24.
  302. STRAIN, to squeeze through something:
    to strain out a gnat, is to filter, as insects
    and worms are strained out of wine be-
    fore drinking, Matt. 23:24.
  303. STRAIT, distress, as in danger from an
    enemy in a narrow road, 1 Sam. 13:6;
    2 Sam. 24:14: perplexity, Phil. 1:21.
  304. STRAIT, small, limited, or narrow, 2
    Kings 6:1; Matt. 7:13: strict, Acts
    26:5.
  305. STRAITEN, to make narrow, or con-
    tract, Jer. 19:9; Job 12:23.
  306. STRAITENED, narrowed, contracted,
    Job 37:10: pressed as with difficulty,
    2 Cor. 6:12.
  307. STRAITLY, directly, particularly, Gen.
    43:7: strictly, Josh. 6:1: rigorously,
    Acts 4:17.
  308. STRAITNESS, necessity, distress, Deut.
    28:53; Jer. 19:9.
  309. STRAKE, struck, did strike or pull
    down, Acts 27:17.
  310. STRAKES, marks or stripes, Gen. 30:
    37; Lev. 14:37.
  311. STRANGE, distant or foreign, as of
    another nation, family, or religion, Gen.
    42:7; Job 19:3; 1 Kings 11:8: un-
    common, or severe, 1 Pet. 4:4: unlawful,
    Lev. 10:1.
  312. STRANGELY, wonderfully, haughtily,
    Deut. 32:27.
  313. STRANGER, one at a distance from his
    native country, Gen. 23:4; Heb. 13:
    2: a captive, Obad. 12: a
    false teacher,
    John 10:5: one who regards Heaven as
    his eternal home, Heb. 11:13: one not
    interested in the privileges of the cove-
    nant of grace, Eph. 2:12.
  314. STRANGLED, suffocated by violent com-
    pression of the throat, Nah. 2:12; Acts
    15:20.
  315. STRANGLING, suffocation by violence
    round the throat, Job 6:15.
  316. STRAW, the stalks of corn, Gen. 24:
    25, 32.
  317. STRAWED, spread, as straw upon a
    stable floor, Matt. 21:8: scattered, as
    dust, Exod. 32:20.
  318. STREAM, a current of running water,
    Num. 21:15; Luke 6:48.
  319. STREET, a paved road in a town, Gen.
    19:2; Judg. 19:15; Acts 12:10: a public
    establishment, 1 Kings 20:34.   "Truth
    fallen in the street,"
    denotes the preva-
    lence of
    wickedness in a city, Isa. 59:14.
  320. STRENGTH, vigour or power, as of the
    body, 1 Sam. 28:22; Acts 3:7: of
    the mind, Psal. 138:3: of a king,
    Isa. 30:3: of a country, Ezek. 30:15:
    of the earth, to be fruitful, Gen. 4:12.
    God, as the source of being and blessed-
    ness to His people, is their strength
    ,
    Exod. 15:2.   Men, as guilty, destitute of
    holiness, are without strength, Rom. 5:6.
  321. STRENGTHEN, to make strong, Judg.
    16:28; Neh. 6:9: to invigorate, 1 Pet.
    5:10: to instruct and encourage, Luke
    22:32: to repair what is decayed, Rev.
    3:2.
  322. STRENGTHENED, did strengthen, Gen.
    48:2; Dan. 10:18.
  323. STRENGTHENED, made strong, Ezra
    7:28: invigorated, Col. 1:11.
  324. STRETCH, to reach out or extend,
    Exod. 7:19.   To stretch out the hand
    to God, is to worship, Job 11:13; Psal.
    68:31: to stretch out the hand to a
    person, is to afford relief, Prov. 31:20;
    or to inflict evil, Acts 12:1.
  325. STRETCHED, did stretch, Gen. 22:10;
    48:14.
  326. STRETCHED, extended, 1 Chron. 21:
    16: overspread, Jer. 6:4.
  327. STRICKEN, beaten, Prov. 23:35:
    afflicted, Isa. 53:8: advanced and marked,
    as in age, Gen. 18:11; Luke 1:7.
  328. STRIFE, contention, Gen. 13:7, 8;
    Luke 22:24.
  329. STRIKE, to hit or give a blow, Deut.
    21:4; Mark 14:65: to contract or bar-
    gain, the sign of which was striking
    hands, Job 17:3; Prov. 22:26: to
    pierce with a weapon thrown, Job 20:
    24; Prov. 7:23.
  330. STRIKER, one that strikes, a violent
    man, 1 Tim. 3:3.
  331. STRING, a cord, as of a bow, Psal. 11:
    2; or of a musical instrument, Psal. 92:
    3: a ligament, as of the tongue, Mark
    7:35.
  332. STRINGED, having strings, as musical
    instruments, Psal. 150:4.
  333. STRIP, to take off clothes, Num. 20:
    26; 1 Sam. 31:8: to bereave, Hos. 2:3.
  334. STRIPE, a blow with a whip or scourge,
    Exod. 21:25; Deut. 25:3: punishment,
    Luke 12:47: wounds made by blows,
    Acts 16:35: afflictions, Isa. 53:5; 1
    Pet. 2:24.
  335. STRIPLING, a youth, 1 Sam. 17:56.
  336. STRIPPED, did strip or unclothe, Gen.
    37:23; Exod. 33:6: did deprive,
    Job 19:9.
  337. STRIPPED, unclothed, Mic. 1:8.
  338. STRIVE, to contend, Gen. 26:20: to
    endeavour earnestly, Rom. 15:30: to
    admonish, Gen. 6:3.
  339. STRIVING, contending, Heb. 12:4:
    labouring, Phil. 1:27.
  340. STRIVINGS, contentions, 2 Sam. 22:
    44: disputings, Tit. 3:9.
  341. STROKE, a blow, Deut. 19:5: de-
    struction, Esth. 9:5: matter of com-
    plaint, Deut. 21:5: calamity, Job 23:
    2.
  342. STRONG, robust, fit for labour, Gen.
    49:14; 1 Sam. 14:52: powerful, Exod.
    6:1: vigorous, Luke 1:80: overpower-
    ing, 2 Thess. 2:11: stimulating, Heb. 5:
    12: animating, 6:18: piously confident,
    Eph. 6:10.
  343. STRONGER, more powerful, Gen. 25:
    23; 2 Sam. 3:1.
  344. STRONGHOLD, a fortified place, as a
    castle, 2 Sam. 5:7; Lam. 2:2: vain
    imaginations, 2 Cor. 10:4.
  345. STRONGLY, firmly, sufficiently, Ezek.
    6:3.
  346. STROVE, did strive, Gen. 26:20: did
    dispute, John 6:52; Acts 23:9.
  347. STRUCK, did strike, 1 Sam. 2:14; Matt.
    26:51: did afflict, 2 Sam. 12:15; 2
    Chron. 13:20.
  348. STRUGGLED, did contend, Gen. 25:
    22.
  349. STUBBLE, the stalks of corn left in the
    field by the reapers, Exod. 5:12.   Wicked
    men are weak and worthless as stubble,
    Job 21:18; Mal. 4:1.   Unscriptural
    doctrines or ceremonies are as stubble,
    1 Cor. 3:12.
  350. STUBBORN, obstinate in evil, Deut. 21:
    18; Judg. 2:19.
  351. STUBBORNNESS, obstinacy in evil, Deut.
    9:27.
  352. STUCK, adhered, Psal. 119:31: held,
    1 Sam. 26:7; Acts 27:41.
  353. STUD, a centre of a button, Sol. Song
    1:11.
  354. STUDY, mental labour, Eccles. 12:
    12.
  355. STUDY, to endeavour, 1 Thess. 4:11;
    Prov. 15:28: to labour, 2 Tim. 2:15.
  356. STUFF, household furniture, Gen. 31:
    37; Exod. 22:7: stored corn, 1 Sam. 10:
    22: baggage or provision, 25:13.
  357. STUMBLE, to trip or slide in walking,
    Prov. 3:23; Jer. 13:16: to be mistaken,
    Isa. 28:7: to be offended, Matt. 2:8;
    1 Pet. 2:8.
  358. STUMBLED, did stumble, 1 Chron. 13:
    9: became offended, Rom. 9:32: fell
    into trouble, Jer. 46:12.
  359. STUMBLING, being offended, 1 John 2:
    10.
  360. STUMBLING-BLOCK, a block of wood
    in the way to occasion stumbling, Lev.
    19:14: a thing that occasions injury,
    Ezek. 3:20: loss, Rom. 9:9: offence,
    1 Cor. 1:23; or ruin, Rev. 2:14.
  361. STUMBLING-STONE, an occasion of
    stumbling, as a stone in a road to a
    traveller at night, Isa. 8:14:
    Christ, in
    His doctrine is an occasion of offence to
    ungodly infidel men, Rom. 9:32; 1 Pet.
    2:8.
  362. STUMP, the thick part of a tree, Dan.
    4:15: the block of the body of an idol,
    1 Sam. 5:4.
  363. SUBDUE, to overcome, Dan. 7:24: to
    make to yield, Phil. 3:21.
  364. SUBDUED, conquered, Num. 32:22:
    reduced to subjection, 1 Sam. 7:13.
  365. SUBJECT, obedient, Luke 2:51; 10:17;
    Rom. 13:1: liable, Jam. 5:17.
  366. SUBJECTION, obedience, Psal. 106:42;
    Heb. 12:9: slavery, Jer. 34:21: per-
    formance of duty, 1 Tim. 2:11.
  367. SUBMIT, to yield in obedience, Gen.
    16:9: to observe as a duty, 1 Pet. 2:13:
    to observe as pastoral instruction, Heb.
    13:17.
  368. SUBMITTED, did submit or yield obe-
    dience, 1 Chron. 29:24: yielded, as to
    a divine ordinance or gift, Rom. 10:3.
  369. SUBORNED, hired for a wicked purpose,
    Acts 6:11.
  370. SUBSCRIBE, to write, as on a roll of
    parchment, as agreeing to a contract,
    Jer. 32:44.   To "subscribe with the
    hand unto the Lord,"
    is solemnly to make
    profession of obedience to the will of
    God, Isa. 44:5.
  371. SUBSCRIBED, did write, as in a deed of
    sale of property, Jer. 32:10.
  372. SUBSTANCE, a creature, an existing
    thing, Gen. 7:4, 23: property, Deut. 11:
    6: wealth, 2 Chron. 32:29: imperish-
    able possessions of glory in
    Heaven, Heb.
    10:34: faith, as the evidence of glory in
    the mind, 11:1.
  373. SUBTIL, crafty, deceitful, Gen. 3:1;
    2 Sam. 13:3.
  374. SUBTILLY, craftily, 1 Sam. 27:22:
    injuriously, Acts 7:19.
  375. SUBTILTY, craft, deceit, Gen. 27:
    35; 2 Kings 10:19: impious malice, Acts
    13:10.
  376. SUBVERT, to turn away from truth and
    equity, Lam. 3:36.
  377. SUBVERTED, led away from divine
    truth by
    false doctrine, Tit. 3:11.
  378. SUBVERTING, deceiving, to turn the
    heart from the truth, Acts 15:24.
  379. SUBURBS, the environs of a city, Josh.
    14:4.   The tribe of
    Levi having no
    division of the land of Canaan, had forty-
    eight cities with some adjacent grounds
    for them to inhabit: their grounds or
    suburbs extended 1000 cubits for small
    buildings, and 2000 more for gardens and
    pastures, Num. 35:3-7.
  380. SUCCEED, to come in the place of
    another, Deut. 2:12; 12:29; 25:6.
  381. SUCCESS, prosperity in an enterprise,
    Josh. 1:8.
  382. SUC'COTH, [h] (tents or tabernacles), the
    first encampment of the
    Israelites on
    their leaving Egypt, Exod. 12:37.
  383. SUCCOTH, a city east of Jordan allotted
    to the tribe of Gad, Gen. 33:17; Josh.
    13:27; Judg. 8:5.
  384. SUCCOTH-BENOTH, [h] (the taber-
    nacles of young women
    ), tents or booths set
    up by the Assyrians for the devoting of
    young maidens to the licentious worship
    of the false goddess Venus, 2 Kings 17:
    30.
  385. SUCCOUR, to help or relieve, 2 Sam.
    8:5; Heb. 2:18.
  386. SUCCOURED, did help or relieve, 2 Sam.
    21:17; 2 Cor. 6:2.
  387. SUCCOURER, a helper, as the generous
    matron Phebe, Rom. 16:2.
  388. SUCH, of the like kind, Gen. 4:20;
    Matt. 18:5; Heb. 5:12.
  389. SUCK, to draw in with the mouth, as
    children their mother's milk, Joel 2:16;
    or as eaglets the blood of prey, Job
    39:30: to derive riches, as from the
    treasures of the seas, Deut. 32:13.   To
    "suck honey out of the rock," is to enjoy
    temporal prosperity, 32:13.   To "suck
    the milk of the Gentiles,"
    and "the breast
    of kings,"
    is to prosper by means of foreign
    commerce, Isa. 60:16.
  390. SUCKING, nourished by its mother's
    milk, as a sucking child, Num. 11:12;
    or a sucking lamb, 1 Sam. 7:9.
  391. SUCKLING, an infant nourished by the
    breast, Jer. 44:7; 1 Sam. 22:9.
  392. SUDDEN, unexpected, hasty, Job 22:
    10; 1 Thess. 5:3.
  393. SUDDENLY, unexpectedly, Num. 6:9:
    in a short time, Luke 2:13; 2 Chron.
    29:36.
  394. SUE, to prosecute by law, Matt. 5:40.
  395. SUFFER, to bear or undergo, Luke
    22:15; Acts 3:18; 5:41: to permit or
    allow, Exod. 12:23; 1 Tim. 2:12.
  396. SUFFERED, did suffer or undergo, as
    pain and loss, Mark 5:26; as
    Christ
    suffered for our sins
    , 1 Pet. 3:18; as
    believers suffered for his sake, 1 Pet. 5:
    10: did permit or allow, Deut. 8:3;
    Mark 1:34; 5:37.
  397. SUFFERING, pain endured, Jam. 5:10.
    Sufferings include all the various calami-
    ties of this life, Rom. 8:18; Phil. 3:10.
  398. SUFFERING, enduring, Jude 7: per-
    mitting, Acts 27:7.
  399. SUFFERINGS of Christ: those circum-
    stances of humiliation, pains of body and
    agonies of soul, which Christ endured in
    making atonement for the sins of the
    world, as our Redeemer
    , Phil. 3:10; 1
    Pet. 1:11; Isa. 53.
  400. SUFFICE, to satisfy the appetite, Num.
    11:22: to be enough, Deut. 3:26.
  401. SUFFICED, did satisfy, as the appetite,
    Ruth 2:14: was enough, Judg. 21:14.
  402. SUFFICIENCY, competency, ability, 2
    Cor. 3:5; 9:8.
  403. SUFFICIENT, enough in quantity, Exod.
    36:7; or in amount, Luke 14:28; or
    in influence, 2 Cor. 12:9.
  404. SUFFICIENTLY, enough, Isa. 23:18;
    2 Chron. 30:3.
  405. SUIT, a set, as of garments, Judg. 17:
    10: a claim to be decided by a judge,
    2 Sam. 15:4: a petition or request, Job
    11:11.
  406. SUM, a certain amount, as of money,
    Exod. 21:30: the whole number, Num.
    1:2: the signification, Ezek. 28:12;
    Dan. 7:1.
  407. SUM, to reckon the amount, 2 Kings
    22:4.
  408. SUMMER, the warm season of the year,
    when the productions of the earth appear
    in their beauty and glory as the gifts of
    our Creator, Gen. 8:22; Matt. 24:32.
    Summer denotes favourable opportunities
    and the means of salvation, Prov. 10:5;
    Zech. 14:8.
  409. SUMMER, to feed, as upon plenty, Isa.
    18:6.
  410. SUMPTUOUSLY, expensively, with great
    costliness, Luke 16:19.
  411. SUN, the glorious orb which is the
    principal source of light and heat to our
    earth, by the wise and powerful appoint-
    ment of the
    Creator, Gen. 1:16.   Benefits
    so many and valuable as those which we
    enjoy by means of this wonderful monu-
    ments of Almighty goodness, have engaged
    the contemplation of the most intelligent
    of mankind.   Astronomers have there-
    fore discovered that the sun is the centre
    of a magnificent system, in which there
    are numerous planets and comets per-
    forming their periodical revolutions in
    perfect harmony, according to the will of
    the Almighty Creator.   Our distance
    from the sun is estimated at about
    95,000,000 of miles, and the diameter of
    the sun is reckoned to exceed 800,000
    miles: but the following table will aid
    the reader in forming a more accurate
    notion of the solar system, as a part of
    THE MANIFOLD WORKS OF GOD.

    GENERAL VIEW OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM.

    Names.
    Periodical Revolution.
    Greatest distance
    from the Earth
    in English miles.
    Least distance
    from the Earth
    in English miles.
    Diameter
    in English
    miles.
    Sun yrs. d. h. m. s. 97 [million] 93 [m] 886,473
    Mercury 0 87 23 14 33 132 [m] 58 [m] 3,191
    Venus 0 224 16 41 27 164 [m] 26 [m] 7,63[?]
    Earth 1 0 5 48 48
    -- -- --
    -- -- --
    7,954
    Moon 0 27 7 43 5 254,084 222,920 2,172
    Mars 1 321 22 18 27 241 [m] 50 [m] 4,135
    Jupiter 11 315 14 39 2 592 [m] 401 [m] 86,396
    Saturn 29 164 7 21 50 1,006 [m] 815 [m] 79,405
    Saturn's King 29 164 7 21 50 1,006 [m] 815 [m] 185,280
    Herschel 83 294 8 39 0 1,918 [m] 1,727 [m] 34,457
    Ceres
    -- -- -- -- --
    345 [m] 155 [m] 1,624
    Pallas
    -- -- -- -- --
    365 [m] 175 [m] 2,000
    Juno
    -- -- -- -- --
    385 [m] 190 [m] 1,425
    Vesta
    -- -- -- -- --
    unknown. unknown. unknown.

       Ceres, Pallas, Juno, and Vesta, were
    all discovered at the beginning of the
    nineteenth century; our knowledge of
    them is therefore but imperfect.   Igno-
    rance and superstition have led mul-
    titudes of the heathen to pay divine
    honours to the sun: hence he was wor-
    shipped by the ancients under the names
    of Baal, Chemosh, Moloch, Phebus, Fire,
    and the King of heaven, as the moon was
    called the Queen, Jer. 7:18; 44:17, 18.
    Three miraculous events are related
    regarding the sun: that it stood still for
    a day at the command of Joshua, Josh. 10:
    12, 13: that it returned back in the time
    of Hezekiah, 2 Kings 20:9-11: that it
    was involved in darkness at the cruci-
    fixion
    of Christ, Matt. 27:45.   Divine
    inspiration
    refers to the sun as furnish-
    ing the most noble similitudes, besides
    giving to the Messiah the title of the
    "Sun of Righteousness," Mal. 4:2.   His
    illustrious and glorious reign is said to
    "continue as long as the sun," Psal. 72:
    17; 89:36; and under his influence,
    wisdom and knowledge shall so greatly
    increase, that the intelligence and happi-
    ness of the world are signified by the
    light of the moon being equal to the light
    of the sun, and the light of the sun being
    seven times more than ordinary, Isa. 30:
    26.   "A woman clothed with the sun
    having the moon under her feet,"
    repre-
    sents [National Israel] clothed with the
    righteousness and grace of Christ, rising
    superior to the attractive glories of this
    sublunary world, Rev. 12:1.   See STAR.
  412. SUN OF RIGHTEOUSNESS, a title of
    Messiah, employed to denote the bene-
    ficial influence of His divine doctrine and
    grace, in the illumination of the world,
    and in saving all who become obedient
    to the ordinances of Christ
    , Mal. 4:2.
  413. SUNDER, division, separation, or parts,
    Isa. 27:9; Nah. 1:13; Luke 12:26.
  414. SUNDERED, separated, Job 41:17.
  415. SUNDRY, several or various, Heb. 1:
    1.
  416. SUNG, did sing, Ezra 3:11; Matt.
    26:30.
  417. SUP, to take an evening meal, Luke
    17:8: to destroy or consume, Hab. 1:9.
    Christ offering to sup with His people,
    denotes the communication of blessings
    to the obedient believer
    , Rev. 3:20.
  418. SUPERFLUITY, an overflow: "super-
    fluity of naughtiness,"
    denotes the over-
    flowing of unholy affections and passions,
    Jam. 1:21.
  419. SUPERFLUOUS, overflowing, excessive,
    Lev. 21:18; 22:23: unnecessary, 2 Cor.
    9:1.
  420. SUPERSCRIPTION, the writing on a
    thing, as on a coin, Matt. 22:20: the
    writing over a suffering prisoner, stating
    the accusation against him: such a writing
    was made by Pilate regarding Christ, and
    exhibited in Hebrew, Greek, and Latin
    ,
    Matt. 15:2; John 19:19-22.
  421. SUPERSTITION, false religion, as the
    extravancies of idolatry were, and as the
    Roman governor regarded even the reli-
    gion of the Jews and of Paul, Acts 17:
    22; 25:19.
  422. SUPERSTITIOUS, excessively fearful,
    so as to do things in religion not required,
    or even extravagant and absurd, Acts
    17:22.
  423. SUPPER, an evening meal, Luke 14:
    12: a feast, Mark 6:21.
  424. SUPPER, the Lord's, the principal sym-
    bolical ordinance
    of Christianity, so called
    because, consisting of bread and [juice], it
    was instituted in the evening, after the
    commemoration of the Passover supper,
    by our
    Lord with His apostles.   This
    [church] ordinance is to be [seriously]
    observed by the [baptized] disciples of Christ, as
    the appointed memorial of His body and
    blood sacrificed for our redemption, by
    the doctrines of which our minds are
    nourished and excited to duty, as our
    bodies are fed by the bread and [juice].
    The Lord's supper was observed by the
    first Christians at [some] of their solemn
    meetings, especially on [Tues]day,
    Matt. 26:26, 36; 1 Cor. 11:20, 30; Acts
    20:7.   Besides the "Lord's supper[,]" this
    ordinance is called the "breaking of
    bread,"
    Acts 2:42; "the feast," 1 Cor. 5:[8];
    and the "communion[:]" but several others
    have been added by designing teachers,
    representing its table as an altar, its
    symbols as a sacrifice or sacrament, and
    its ministers as priests, to the fearful
    injury of the cause of religion and the
    perversion of Christianity.
  425. SUPPLANT, to displace by stratagem,
    Jer. 9:4.
  426. SUPPLANTED, displaced by stratagem,
    Gen. 27:36.
  427. SUPPLE, to soften, to cleanse, Ezek.
    16:4.
  428. SUPPLIANTS, persons soliciting favours,
    Zeph. 3:10.
  429. SUPPLICATION, entreaty, prayer, 1 Sam.
    13:12; Dan. 6:11; 1 Tim. 2:1.
  430. SUPPLIED, furnished with relief for
    necessities, 1 Cor. 16:17; or parts adapted
    for use and comfort, Eph. 4:16.
  431. SUPPLY, relief of want, temporal or
    spiritual, 2 Cor. 8:14; Phil. 1:19.
  432. SUPPORT, to sustain, relieve, or main-
    tain, Acts 20:35; 1 Thess. 5:14.
  433. SUPPOSE, to think, Luke 7:43: to
    imagine as fact, 2 Sam. 13:32.
  434. SUPPOSED, did suppose, did think, Mark
    6:49: did expect, Matt. 20:10.
  435. SUPPOSED, reputed, Luke 3:23.
  436. SUPPOSING, thinking, John 20:15:
    intending, Phil. 1:16: expecting, Luke
    2:44.
  437. SUPREME, chief, as a ruler or king,
    1 Pet. 2:13.
  438. SUR, [h] (that withdraws or departs), the
    eastern gate to the temple of Solomon,
    called by several names, 2 Kings 11:6;
    15:35; 2 Chron. 27:3.   In the second
    temple it was called the Beautiful, Acts
    3:2.
  439. SURE, fixed or lasting, Isa. 28:16;
    2 Sam. 23:5: certain, unfailing, Dan.
    2:45: confident, Rom. 15:29.  
    Believers
    making their calling and election sure,
    is proving their privileged state by
    advancement in knowledge and holiness,
    2 Pet. 1:19.
  440. SURELY, certainly, Gen. 2:17; 50:24:
    confidently, Heb. 6:14.
  441. SURETISHIP, the obligation of a surety,
    Prov. 11:15.
  442. SURETY, certainty, Gen. 15:13; Acts
    12:11: one who undertakes to discharge
    the obligations of another, Gen. 43:9;
    Prov. 11:15.
  443. SURETY, Christ, as the surety of the
    better testament, undertook to render a
    perfect obedience to the law of God and
    to satisfy the claims of divine justice,
    thereby making an atonement for sinners,
    and to preserve believers in their course
    of holiness to everlasting glory and im-
    mortality
    , Heb. 7:22.
  444. SURFEITING, luxurious feasting, Luke
    21:34.
  445. SURMISINGS, suspicious thoughts re-
    specting others, 1 Tim. 6:4.
  446. SURPRISED, seized unexpectedly, Isa.
    33:14.
  447. SUSANNA, [g] (a lily, a rose, or joy),
    a holy woman who contributed to the
    support of
    Christ, Luke 8:2, 3.
  448. SU'SI, [h] (horse or swallow), a chief of
    Manasseh, one of the spies sent to exa-
    mine Canaan, Num. 13:11.
  449. SUSTAIN, to support, 1 Kings 17:9:
    to relieve and comfort, Psal. 55:22.
  450. SUSTAINED, supported, Gen. 27:37:
    preserved, Psal. 3:5.
  451. SUSTENANCE, food or corn, 2 Sam. 19:
    32; Acts 7:11.
  452. SWADDLE, to wrap up in folds or bands
    as children newly-born, Lam. 2:22; Ezek.
    16:4.
  453. SWADDLING-BAND, a bandage, Job
    38:9.
  454. SWADDLING CLOTHES, clothes to bind
    round the bodies of newly-born children,
    Luke 2:7.
  455. SWALLOW, a small well-known bird of
    passage, which builds its nest in chimneys
    or the roofs of houses, and is common in
    Europe, as well as in the East, Psal.
    84:3; Jer. 8:7.
  456. SWALLOW, to take down the throat,
    Job 7:19; Jon. 1:17: to engulf, Num.
    16:30: to seize upon, Psal. 21:9; Prov.
    1:12.
  457. SWALLOWED, taken down the throat,
    Exod. 7:17: engulfed, Num. 16:32:
    absorbed, Job 6:3.  
    Death will be
    swallowed up of victory and life in the
    destruction of sorrow and death by the
    resurrection to eternal life, 1 Cor. 15:54;
    2 Cor. 5:4.
  458. SWAN, a large well-known water-fowl,
    Lev. 11:18; Deut. 14:16.
  459. SWARE, did swear, Gen. 21:31; Luke
    1:73.
  460. SWARM, a great multitude of insects,
    Exod. 8:21-31; Judg. 14:8.
  461. SWEAR, to utter an oath, Gen. 21:23:
    to promise with special solemnity, Josh.
    2:12; Heb. 6:13.
  462. SWEARING, appealing to God, Hos. 10:
    4: profanely appealing to God, Jer. 23:
    10.
  463. SWEAT, perspiration, Ezek. 44:8.
    Terror and
    agony sometimes produce
    bloody sweat, as was the case with our
    Saviour in the garden of Gethsemane
    ,
    Luke 22:44.
  464. SWEEP, to clean a floor with a broom
    or besom, Luke 15:8: to carry off with
    violence, as a tempest, Isa. 14:23; 28:
    17.
  465. SWEET, palatable, delicious, Neh. 8:
    10; Prov. 24:13: odoriferous, Isa. 3:
    24: delightful, consoling, Psal. 55:14:
    amiable, 2 Sam. 23:1.
  466. SWEETLY, deliciously, Job 24:20;
    Sol. Song 7:9.
  467. SWEETNESS, deliciousness, Ezek. 3:3:
    fragrance, Judg. 9:11: pleasantness,
    Prov. 16:21; 27:9.
  468. SWELL, to distend, Num. 5:21, 27: to
    become sore, blistering, Deut. 8:4.
  469. SWELLING, overflowing, as the river
    Jordan by the melting of the snow on
    Lebanon, Jer. 49:19: boasting, 2 Pet.
    2:18.
  470. SWEPT, cleansed by sweeping, Matt.
    12:44: borne away, as by an overflowing
    river, Judg. 5:21; or by death, Jer. 46:
    15.
  471. SWERVED, wandered or departed, 1
    Tim. 1:6.
  472. SWIFT, quick in motion, Deut. 28:
    49: speedy, in time, 2 Pet. 2:1: ready or
    prepared in mind, Jam. 1:19.
  473. SWIFTER, more swift, more quick in
    motion, 2 Sam. 1:23; Hab. 1:8.
  474. SWIFTLY, fleetly, rapidly, Dan. 9:21:
    quickly, soon, Isa. 5:26; Joel 3:4.
  475. SWIM, to float on the water, 2 Kings
    6:6; Isa. 25:11: to wet profusely,
    Psal. 6:6.
  476. SWINE, a hog, a pig, declared unclean
    by the ritual law of Moses, Lev. 11:7;
    and abhorred by the Jews: hence the
    implied degradation of the prodigal son in
    feeding swine, Luke 15:15.   "A jewel of
    gold in a swine's snout,"
    is a proverbial ex-
    pression regarding propriety of manners
    and behaviour, Prov. 11:22.   To "cast...
    pearls before swine,"
    Matt. 7:6, is also
    proverbial, denoting that so to act is not
    more absurd and wasteful, than to offer
    the words of wisdom to sensual profane
    scoffers.   The herd of swine miraculously
    destroyed belonged to Jews, kept in vio-
    lation of the law of God, Matt. 8:32;
    Lev. 11:7.
  477. SWOLLEN, swelled, Acts 28:6.
  478. SWOON, to faint away, as with want or
    wounds, Lam. 2:11, 12.
  479. SWORD, a sharp cutting weapon of war,
    adapted for cutting or thrusting, Gen.
    34:25; 1 Sam. 31:4: the means of
    destruction, Exod. 5:21; Ezra 9:7: war
    with its calamities, Lev. 26:33; Mic.
    5:6.
  480. SWORD OF THE SPIRIT, the word of
    God, which is so called as being the
    means of piercing the soul with convic-
    tions of guilt, and of cutting off evil affec-
    tions, in leading to repentance and salva-
    tion
    by the grace of the Holy Spirit
    , Eph.
    6:17; Heb. 4:12.
  481. SWORN, promised or engaged by oath,
    Gen. 22:16; Josh. 9:18, 19; Acts 2:30.
  482. SYCAMINE, a kind of mulberry tree,
    Luke 17:6.
  483. SYCAMORE, a species of fig-tree, called
    the Egyptian or mulberry tree; it
    grows to a magnificent size, and is com-
    mon in Palestine, Egypt, and Arabia
    Luke 19:4; 1 Kings 10:27.
  484. SYCHAR, a city of Samaria, John 4:5;
    the same as Shechem.   See SHECHEM.
  485. SYCHEM, Sychar, or Shechem, Acts 7:
    16.   See SHECHEM.
  486. SYE'NE, [h] (a bush), a fortified place
    or city on the southern frontiers of Egypt
    towards Ethiopia, Ezek. 29:10; 30:6.
  487. SYNAGOGUE, an assembly or congre-
    gation, John 9:22; 12:42; Rev. 2:4: the
    building in which a
    Jewish congregation
    assembled to read the law and worship
    God, Luke 7:5; Acts 18:20.   Build-
    ings of this kind were erected in most of
    the cities of Judea and Galilee after the
    return of the Jews from Babylon, and the
    completion of the Old Testament.   Ezra
    is thought to have suggested this pro-
    vision; and it became common after the
    time of the Maccabees; though there were
    previously places of prayer erected at a
    short distance from the cities, Acts 16:
    13: they are also called synagogues,
    Psal. 74:8.
  488. SYNAGOGUE OF SATAN; a congregation
    of Jews maliciously opposed to the
    gospel,
    Rev. 2:9; 3:9.
  489. SYN'TYCHE, [g] (that speaks, or dis-
    courses
    , or is affable), a women of some
    note in the
    church at Philippi, Phil. 4:2.
  490. SYRACU'SE, [g] (that draws vio-
    lently
    ), a famous city on the east of Sicily,
    Acts 28:12.   The history of this
    place, honoured by the birth of the great
    mathematician Archimedes, is identified
    with that of Sicily: it was once the
    largest city of the Greeks; it was taken
    by the Romans about the year 206 B.C.,
    when they slew that extraordinary man.
    Syracuse still continues, and contains
    about 15,000 inhabitants, nominally Chris-
    tians.
  491. SYR'IA, Heb. [h] (Aram), Gr. Συρια
    (sublime, or that deceives): this country was
    called
    Aram, from a grandson of Noah,
    whose descendants gave this name to the
    whole country of Mesopotamia and Chal-
    dea
    : but Syria properly was bounded on
    the west by the Mediterranean, on the
    north by Cilicia, on the east by the
    Euphrates, and on the south by Canaan
    and part of Arabia Deserta, Judg. 10:6.
    Damascus was the chief city on
    the south, as its northern capital was
    Antioch, 2 Sam. 8:5; Isa. 7:2; Acts
    11:19; 14:21.
  492. SYRIACK, the vernacular language of
    Syria, Dan. 2:4.
  493. SYRIAN, a native of Syria, Gen. 25:
    20; Deut. 26:5.
  494. SYRIAN, belonging to Syria, as the
    language, Ezra 4:7.
  495. SYROPHENICIAN, a native of Syrophe-
    nicia, Matt. 7:26.   This country was
    properly Phenicia, but it became so
    denominated after it had been annexed
    by conquest to the kingdom of Syria.
    The Syrophenician woman is called a
    woman of Canaan, of the coasts of Tyre
    and Sidon, Matt. 15:21, 22.

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